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January 18, 2022 newsletter

Louet Loom Prices

The price of Louet looms will be increasing on February 1st, 2022. If you have been dreaming about a new loom, there is no better time than the present!

We offer FREE shipping on all Louet looms within Continental North America. We also offer the option to pay a $1000.00 CAD deposit on your loom with the balance due when the loom ships out to you. This gives you the flexibility to make smaller payments towards your balance, at your convenience.


Last chance on semi-bleached Tussah!

Our silk supplier is no longer carrying the semi-bleached 20/2 Tussah silk that we’ve been hand-dying for the past 10 years. But that’s okay …. we are switching over to a bleached Tussah that will make those colours brighter and clearer, more like the 20/2 and 30/2 Bombyx.

So …. if you loved that golden, honey coloured semi-bleached Tussah, now’s the time to get it while we have a few skeins left in stock. 

Ask Jane

Finishing Handwoven Silk

I have recently woven a 20/2 silk scarf in a lace weave, which turned out beautifully. However, when I washed it, spun it for 30 seconds in the gentle spin, hung to dry and ironed it dampish, the fabric is still showing creases, which won’t iron out. The same thing happened with the last three bamboo scarves in plain weave. I cannot get the creases out. I rewashed them but it didn’t make a difference. Where have I gone wrong? Silk loves to crease when it is wet. When I wash my silk, I never wring it out. I have always hand washed my silk scarves and stoles in the kitchen sink and I let them drip dry in my shower. Imagine taking your silk scarf and lowering it into your sink, lowering it down like an accordion. I then raise and lower the silk up and down to wash it. When I have finished the washing I accordion it into a lasagna pan sitting beside the sink. Rinse it the same way, always ‘accordioning’ it, never wringing it. I take the lasagna pan up to the shower and drape the scarf over a broom handle stretched across the shower (I have a corner shower) and I let the scarf drip dry. Then I steam press it with a thin cloth over it.  Same thing with any fine yarn, like bambu.
You can check out Season 1 Episode 10 at School of Weaving on finishing fabrics, video Handwashing Silk Fabrics 1.10.4 where Jane demonstrates this technique with Charlie’s Silk Scarf.


Here to help

Have a weaving question? Find us on the Jane Stafford School of Weaving Forum and

on Weave with Jane Stafford at Ravelry.

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January 11th, 2022 newsletter

Mohair Prices

Our Brushed Mohair prices are going through the roof again. We just love weaving with this yarn and we are not going to give up on it! BUT…the prices are going up on the 1st of February so if you’re into making Mohair Blankies you might want to stock up now.

Present Price: C$34.50/100g, New Price: C$40.00/100g

Brushed 78% mohair, 13% wool, 9% nylon, available in 100 g cones – 215 yds/cone (approx. 975 yds/lb).

Sett
Plain Weave at 6 epi and 7 ppi for a cozy, cozy, cozy blankie,
Twill with Harrisville Shetland as the warp sett at 8 epi and mohair for the weft sett at 8 ppi for a cozy and fuzzy fabric.

Knitting Needles: 5-6 mm (8-10 US) Gauge: 3-4 sts per inch.

Never worked with brushed mohair before? Download our Mohair Blankie Quick Reference Guide.

Two Stripe Mohair Blanket Kit

Blankets don’t come much more luxurious than when they’re woven in brushed mohair. Mohair is strong, durable and, above all, warm. Drape one of these bad boys over your shoulders and you’ll need to turn down that heating a few notches. Our Two Stripe Mohair Blanket Kit has everything you need to make a beautifully coloured blanket which will stir up thoughts of glorious, crisp, spring days. We can use those mental images in the depths of January 🙂

Each kit contains the following:
-One set of instructions to weave one mohair throw 41” x 74” plus fringes; includes instructions for warping with sticky threads front to back; threading; weaving and finishing.
-Warp: material for 1 x 3-yard warp containing 270 threads
-Weft: appropriate colours for the pattern
-Approximately 800g of mohair

We have a few Two Stripe Mohair Blanket Kits in stock with the following colour combinations!

Lilac & Sky Blue

Light Grey & Natural

Oatmeal & Camel

Royal & Turquoise

Purple & Moss

Black & Grey


From our Inbox

Jane has worked with the weavers of Sabahar in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia since 2016. After her last trip in 2019 she had an idea, to try and supply as many weavers at Sabahar and their outside weavers with texsolv heddles for their looms. YOU, our weavers, purchased the heddles with 100% of your donations going to Texsolv in Sweden…and we were able to purchase 1000 bundles of heddles. It was so wonderful and made such a difference to the weavers.  

This year when we learned of Sabahar’s plans for expansion in these crazy times Jane decided to purchase another 400 bundles to make things easier.

A huge heartfelt thanks to everyone who took part in the original fundraiser and to all our customers who help us help others. Last week we received Sabahar’s newsletter and wanted to share it with you 🙂

Facing the future with creativity, optimism, and innovation.

What a challenging year we all faced in 2021. As the year comes to an end, we are reminded that despite this, we have so much to be thankful for. In the last year, we shipped a staggering 64,894 hand-loomed products around the world, an 80% increase from 2020! Thanks to the steady orders from our loyal customers, we have been able to hire seven new at-home weavers and three new in-house weavers, bringing us to just over 100 weavers. The increase in our orders also dramatically increased the number of women who spin our cotton from 40 to close to 200. We are now proudly offering a stable income to over 94 full-time employees and around 300 artisans. OUR HEARTFELT THANKS TO ALL OUR CUSTOMERS – NEAR AND FAR!!

Ethiopia is going through difficult times and we are doing our best to mitigate the negative economic effects by continuing to provide the security of income and employment for our artisans and workers. Calculating a “living wage” for our staff with inflation rising at around 40% in 2021 alone was interesting… to say the least. We have also continued to support our staff by providing small loans and a savings program. With determination and amazing teamwork, our staff have managed to ensure a reliable supply of raw materials as well as timely production and shipping of products amid a multitude of unpredictable factors.

With the support of Jane Stafford and Texsolv, we have provided the highest quality of heddles to home-based weavers and helped them set up four harness looms, a long-term goal of ours. We are so excited about the product and design possibilities these advancements will bring. Jane Stafford has been working with Sabahar for over five years and has been an inspirational teacher and mentor for our weavers. The team at Texsolv in Sweden, are always ready to support us with great products at discounted prices with such generosity. We have been truly blessed by all these friends!

Looking forward into 2022

Our strong foundation, creative solutions, loyal team, and dedicated customers have allowed Sabahar to continue to grow despite challenging circumstances. We are continuously expanding our range of products and this year, we are focusing on our waffle towels. We are happy to announce a fabulous new color range and an additional size. Bronze and Ivory have been added to our Zarima waffle towel collection and they will now be woven as a full solid and no longer have the thick white stripe on the bottom. We have also added a larger size waffle towel to our range. This new Zarima bath sheet will now be the size of our beach towels (100 x 180cm) and is available in the same color palette as the bath towel.

Keep an eye out for our new beach throw/sarong! It has a completely new woven design made possible by moving to 4 harness looms. We are so excited to show you these new products in the new year!!

As some of us take down our Christmas decorations, the holiday season is just beginning in Ethiopia. Like many Orthodox Christians around the world, Ethiopia celebrates Christmas on January 7th with prayer, food, and family, after a 45 day-long fast where only vegan food is consumed. In observance of the holiday, Sabahar will be closed from January 7th to the 10th.

Merry Christmas or Melkam Genna to all of you. May the Christmas prayers bring peace and health to us all.


JST Sabahar Blogs


Over several months in 2019, Jane wrote 4 blog posts prior to launching the Heddles for Sabahar Fundraiser. To begin to read all 4 posts, click here. You will be inspired!

Jane at Sabahar 2019

We are pleased to offer FREE shipping on all Louet looms within Continental North America. We also offer the option to pay a $1000.00 CAD deposit on your loom with the balance due when the loom ships out to you. This allows the flexibility to make smaller payments towards your balance at your convenience.

Here to Help

Have a weaving question? Find us on the Jane Stafford School of Weaving Forum and

on Weave with Jane Stafford at Ravelry.

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January 6th 2022, newsletter

Happy New Year!

2022 is upon us and the light is coming back. I’m already noticing our days getting a wee bit longer. Gotta love it!

I haven’t made any specific New Year’s resolutions, but I have tried to make intentions. I intend to be kinder to myself this year. I intend to listen to my poor achy body and not push it so hard. I intend to perfect my new mantra “whatever”….and let things go, because really, do those little glitches in life really matter? Even the big glitches are hard to control, so I intend to just be grateful for all I’ve got and keep moving forward. Heck……I’ve got to get on it because I’m going to be an Old Age Pensioner this year…..How did that happen 🙂 I’m not bothered by it, but I am kind of shocked.

My wish for you is that you’ll give yourselves the love you deserve. Be kind to yourself, weave kindness into each day and it will radiate out to all around you.

So…..off we go…..another year of weaving 🙂
Sending tons of love,
Jane


In case you missed it

School of Weaving Season 6 trailer is out! We begin 2022 with the Introduction to Units, Blocks & Profiles on January 20th. Lots of time to binge watch Season 5! If you haven’t subscribed yet, you can do so with our 7-day free trial.

Already a subscriber and not sure when your renewal date is?

Don’t worry! We’ll send you an email on your expiry day with instructions on how to renew. Just this once, since you will be renewing for the first time on our new website School of Weaving, please let your subscription expire as you cannot renew until then. Once your subscription expires you will then need to go through the 7-day free trial and enter your payment details as well as choose if you want to pay yearly or monthly.

If you still have questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us at info@schoolofweaving.tv or call us Monday to Friday 9 am to 4 pm PDT at 1-250-537-9468.


Huck Lace Cotton Tea Towel Kits

Looking for a splash of colour to pull you out of the white and grey skies of a northern winter? These Plain Weave and Huck tea towels are certain to bring a bit of sunshine and colour onto your loom and add a bit of zing to your kitchen. For those of you who live in sunshine at this time of year – weave them just for the joy of it!

Each JST Huck Lace Cotton Tea Towel kit includes the PDF pattern and weaving instructions along with all the 8/2 cotton needed to weave these towels.
Level of Difficulty: Advanced Beginner Weave structure: Plain Weave & Huck Lace
Material: 6 cones of 8/2 Cotton
Loom shaft requirement: 4
Reed size: 12 dent
Weaving width: 25 ½”
Each kit makes: 8 Tea Towels

Mountain Views

Falling Leaves


From our Inbox

Just before our holiday break we received a lovely note from Lynn of Cody, Wyoming that we just had to share with everyone. Well done Lynn!

“I’ve attached a photo of the tea towels I made for my bookclub for Christmas and, borrowing Jane’s creative way of displaying her towels, I hung them on a clothesline. You’ll probably recognize various lessons from Seasons 1 and 2.”

We always love seeing what everyone’s been up to…so please send it along 🙂

Here to help

Have a weaving question? Find us on the Jane Stafford School of Weaving Forum and

on Weave with Jane Stafford at Ravelry.


We are pleased to offer free shipping on all Louet looms within Continental North America. We also offer the option to pay a $1000.00 CAD deposit on your loom with the balance due when the loom ships out to you. This allows the flexibility to make smaller payments towards your balance at your convenience.
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December 21st, 2021 newsletter

Thank you – we couldn’t do it without you!

Wishing you all a peaceful, safe and joyous Holiday Season

As I reflect on this past year I am struck by how wonderful it is to be surrounded by folks that weave goodness and kindness into their lives and those around them. It has been another year of challenges for people all over the world, yet so many of you have helped us help others. 

In particular, I want to thank all of you who supported us as we did our bit to assist the Artist Alliance of Jawaja in India. We are grateful to everyone who purchased a pattern which reinforced our commitment to the Maiwa Foundation as they provide support to these amazing, creative artisans during COVID. Our help is so important. JST has recently been able to purchase another large batch of heddles for the weavers of Sabahar in Ethiopia. Kathy is committed to getting more weavers working from home during these troubling times and texsolv heddles are so beneficial to the weavers and make their production more proficient. All of these talented artisans are currently facing challenges that go far beyond “just” COVID. I only have to think of these groups for a second to be reminded of how truly blessed I am. 

So thank you, thank you again and again for all the support you give to JST, every customer, every student, every friend 🙂 It is so appreciated.

Sending you all hope, love and best wishes for a Happy New Year.
Love Jane


We will be closed for the holidays from December 25th to January 2nd.
Last orders for shipping before the holidays is December 24th.
Orders placed during our closed days will be processed on January 4th, 2022.


Here to help

You can always find us on the Jane Stafford School of Weaving Forum or on Weave with Jane Stafford at Ravelry.

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December 15th, 2021 Newsletter

Looking for a Last Minute Gift?

We have Gift Certificates
JST Shop & School of Weaving!

You choose the amount that you wish to give and we’ll email the recipient their JST Gift Certificate. They will then be able to put it towards something on their Wish List.

  Please note that this gift certificate cannot be used for the Jane Stafford School of Weaving.

OR

Give the gift of learning with an all-access subscription to
Jane Stafford School of Weaving.

Choose to give 1-12 months.
We’ll email the recipient instructions on how to sign in to their new subscription.
They can activate it at any time!


JST’s Hand-dyed Tussah

One of our hand-dyed silks made its way into the Handwoven Magazine’s Nov/Dec 2021 issue! Natalie Drummond’s Deflected Double Weave Cool Breeze project uses our 20/2 Tussah silk along with space-dyed Tencel. We were so pleased to see that she had chosen to work with our JST hand-dyed Felicitation! The results are just beautiful!

To view more of Natalie’s work, follow her on Instagram


School of Weaving Kits Season 6 Now Available

Episode 2 – 8 Shaft Twill Blocks & Tie-up Quadrants

Episode 3 – Monk’s Belt

Episode 4 – Overshot


We will be closed for the holidays from December 25th to January 2nd.
The last order for shipping before the holidays is December 24th.
Orders placed during our closed days will be processed on January 4th, 2022.

Here to help

Have a weaving question? Find us on the Jane Stafford School of Weaving Forum and

on Weave with Jane Stafford at Ravelry.

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December 7th, 2021 newsletter

The Enxtended Units, Blocks & Profiles Workshop Coming to You Online in 2022!

Season 6 is ready to roll out the door. How exciting … another layer of ideas and understanding added to our garden of weaving knowledge. Our weaving soil is getting better and better and I can hardly wait to see what you grow this year. 

Units, Blocks and Profiles are the 3 words that we will dance around in 2022.  We’ve heard those words before but now we’ll take a deeper look at them. We’ll study a few new structures (well, actually very old structures) and see how we can use everything we’ve learned about design in fresh new ways. This little video should get you all jazzed up about what’s coming your way at the School of Weaving 🙂

xo Jane

School of Weaving Units, Blocks & Profiles Trailer

Sneak peak at what we’ll be weaving!

Monk’s Belt like you’ve never seen before
A new modern approach to the classic Overshot

Continuing on with Turned Twill, working with so many blocks
Overshot Name Drafting – the designs possibilities are endless

Sign up for your FREE 7-day trial

Available today are Seasons 1 through 5

An all-access subscription to Jane Stafford School of Weaving.
You get 50 weaving lessons from the previous 5 years of instructions with your subscription plus all pattern drafts needed!
Sign up now and you’ll also receive a new episode every 5 weeks starting January 20th, 2022
You can subscribe between 1 to 12 months!

Season 5 lessons on Laces!
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November 30th, 2021 newsletter

JST Wishlist

If all you want for Christmas is “stuff” for your weaving obsession and your family knows…then we understand and have you covered 😉

Make your own Wishlist on our website and share it!


A few of our Favourite Things

Stocking stuffers!


Mary’s Tunic

I was blown away when I saw what Mary had done with the Canvas Weave sample this year. The story behind it touched my heart. We asked Mary if she would be willing to write a blog post about her weaving journey and the tunic she wove after her husband asked her the simple question “What are you going to make with it?”. Read her interesting and touching story below.
Jane
 My first experience of weaving took place when I was given a small Spears weaving loom for my 10th birthday.  I loved that little loom and seem to recall weaving a variety of striped, wavy edged samples on it in the bright, primary coloured acrylic yarns that came with the loom. Fast forward many decades (more than I care to remember) and I’m once again weaving lots of samples but now they are rather more sophisticated, less irregular, and the yarns are usually made from natural fibres.

Spear weaving Loom

I started spinning about 18 years ago and weaving seemed a natural progression. At the time there were very few weavers in the guild to which I then belonged so I set about teaching myself to weave using every resource I could find; books, magazines, videos and YouTube. I actually spent far more time reading weaving books and studying pattern drafts than reading novels. Then a few years ago a fellow weaver, Ian, told me about the JST online guild and I joined that same day. It was the start of Season 2 Plain Weave and now 4 years on I am still following Jane’s classes and learning so much from her.

I was really pleased to discover that Season 5 was devoted to lace weave as it was a structure I had not previously explored. Here in the UK, it’s not always easy to source similar yarns to the ones Jane uses and I often find it quite a challenge to find suitable substitutes. For lesson 2 on Canvas Weave though, I used yarns that I already had in my stash hoping they would give satisfactory results. The warp was a cotton and linen mix 28 wpi that I purchased on eBay some years ago and the other yarn I incorporated was pale blue Bockens linen yarn 30 wpi that I was given just before lockdown.

I warped up my Louet David loom with the suggested 6 yard warp at 16 epi and set about weaving the sampler as per Jane’s instructions, finding the labels attached to the treadles especially helpful when trying to ‘own the structure’ as Jane puts it.

I was delighted with the way the yarns were weaving up and loved the patterns that were emerging. The more I wove the more I felt that the fabric deserved to be more than just a sampler. The glimmer of an idea began to develop as I continued to weave the 20 samples, trying to square them up consistently. There was quite a lot of warp remaining which I used to create a length of ecru  plain weave throwing in random double picks throughout.

When I showed the finished fabric to my husband his immediate reaction was to ask what was I going to make with it. When told it was just a sampler his response confirmed my original thoughts entirely, it was crying out to become something more. Sadly this was the last piece of my weaving that my husband saw as he passed away shortly afterwards.

Some months later though on a miserable rainy day I decided it was the right time to put my idea into action rather than mope around the house. I had planned to make a tunic top from the sampler. First I took photos of all of the samples so I could refer back to them if need be.

Images of some of the samples

The pattern I used was a Butterick pattern 3383. It was one that was recommended in a Handwoven magazine some years ago as being ideal for using with handwoven fabric. It consists of just three very simple pieces with no darts or facings.

Normally when I am sewing with handwoven yardage I make a mock up first but there was no need on this occasion as I had made up this pattern twice before with some handwoven plain weave (Season 2) so I already knew what tweaks I needed to make to the sizing and neck line.

I carefully selected and cut two lengths of fabric from near the beginning of the sampler to form the centre panels of the front and back. I then cut the plain ecru strip in half lengthways. The selvedges of these strips were machined to either side of the centre panels so there was no need to over-lock the edges of the seams. The front and back pieces were cut out and immediately over-locked all round the edges before seaming them together. With the body made, I then set about the sleeves.

There was not sufficient width to cut out the sleeves along the length of the grain so they were cut out across its width, two pieces of fabric for each sleeve. I carefully positioned the pattern so that the dominant lines between the samples were similarly positioned on each of the sleeve caps as this is what the eye would go to. Likewise with the bottom half of each sleeve. The edges of all four pieces were over-locked to secure them before joining them together, the assembled sleeves were duly inserted and the armhole seams over-locked. The final step was to machine stitch all of the simple hems.  

I was delighted when, at the end of the day, I put the garment on a coat hanger and stood back to look at the final result. Everything had fitted together perfectly and I couldn’t really find much fault with it which, for me, is almost unheard of. I usually see something I’m not entirely happy with! I think I must have had a helping hand that day and I’m sure I heard a voice say “Well done kid”. Hardly a kid but it’s what my husband would have said to me.

Making this tunic has set me thinking about how I might use future samplers. I love sampling different weave structures but a lot of time, money (I often purchase yarn specially to produce the samplers) and love goes into making them and it always seems a shame to assign them to a box or drawer rarely to see the light of day again. It was really satisfying to produce something wearable from the sampler and I can still refer back to the patterns whenever I need to.

Looking for a gift for a Friend?

Give the gift of learning for a weaving friend, an all-access subscription to Jane Stafford School of Weaving. You can purchase a one-month subscription gift or as many months as you would like, anywhere up to 12. They will have time to binge-watch all previous 5 Seasons over the holidays before we head into Season 6.

Units, Blocks & Profiles, starting January 20th, 2022!


Here to help

You can always find us on the Jane Stafford School of Weaving Forum or on Weave with Jane Stafford at Ravelry.


We are pleased to offer free shipping on all Louet looms within Continental North America. We also offer the option to pay a $1000.00 CAD deposit on your loom with the balance due when the loom ships out to you. This allows the flexibility to make smaller payments towards your balance at your convenience.
With exciting advances made to both the Louet Spring Loom and the Louet David Loom,
there is no better time for your dream of a new loom to come true.

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November 16th, 2021 newsletter

Planning ahead ….

Holiday Season 2021 may be just as challenging for family gatherings as 2020 was – only time will tell. However, that doesn’t mean that you can’t weave yourself a wee bit of elegance to wrap up in on special days. With one woven as a treat for you, you can weave another that could become a gift for a special person in your life. You can’t tell by looking at the finished scarf that it is such a quick and simple weave structure to create. Win-win!

Pucker Up Mochachino Scarves Kit

These scarves are a great introduction to a simple collapse weave. This kit provides enough silk and merino to create 2 stunning scarves with finished dimensions of  12″ x 75″ plus fringe. All you need is a simple 4 shaft loom a 10 dent reed and a weaving width of 18″.

This Kit contains:
1 skein of 30/2 Bombyx Silk – Birch
1 skein of 30/2 Bombyx Silk – Violet Ice
2-50g skeins of Merino Wool – Vanilla
2-50g skeins of Merino Wool – Suede

Learn all about the simple collapse weave structure on the School of Weaving Season 3 Episode 6 Simple Collapse Weave lesson.

Open Weave Basket Kit

Looking for something completely different???? The Garlic Baskets make welcome gifts for anyone who loves to cook. Well, it is still weaving but with a whole different technique. This kit includes the material for 3 baskets – 3 sets of spokes and 3 sets of weavers in a range of natural and dyed colours for you to mix and match. They are one of my favourite baskets because of the variety of shapes you can create.….and they don’t all have to hold garlic….you’ll come up with all kinds of uses!

If you have a subscription to School of Weaving, you can follow Joan & Jane as they make these baskets in Season 2 Episode 9.

Looms at JST

With exciting advances made to both the Louet Spring Loom and the Louet David Loom – there is no better time for your dream of a new loom to come true!

We are pleased to offer free shipping on all Louet looms within Continental North America. We also offer the option to pay a $1000.00 CAD deposit on your loom with the balance due when the loom ships out to you, this allows the flexibility to make smaller payments towards your balance at your convenience.

David III Louet Loom

Available in three sizes:

  • David 70: 27 ½″ (70 cm) weaving width
  • David 90: 35″ (90 cm) weaving width
  • David 110: 43 ½” (110 cm) weaving width

Spring II Louet Loom

Available in two sizes and in either 8 or 12 shafts:

  • Spring 90: 35″ (90 cm) weaving width – 8 shaft
  • Spring 90: 35″ (90 cm) weaving width – 12 shaft
  • Spring 110: 43 ½” (110 cm) weaving width – 8 shaft
  • Spring 110: 43 ½” (110 cm) weaving width – 12 shaft

JST Gift Certificates

You can set up a Wish List on the JST Shop Store! Then just drop a hint – or two, mention that your list can be found there! You can manage your list under your account which gives you different options on how you might want to share it 😉 Your close circle can get a chance to look at your list and possibly give you a JST Gift Certificate for something you are really wishing for.

Ask Jane

Help – my scarves won’t shrink!

I’m just starting out in the weaving field. I’ve been making scarves in baby alpaca/bamboo/cashmere/silk/& camel—or some combination thereof. (Mostly baby alpaca and silk, 80/20, with a bit of cashmere.)Here’s the question: I “wash” in good warm water,  just below “burning” me, with a bit of soap. I mush them a bit, gently massage them, but mostly let them soak—for maybe 30-40 minutes. Then rinse them well in the same temp. water. Then air-dry them.But my scarves don’t shrink—at all.  Or very, very little. In fact, they’re sometimes a bit larger!!! And they don’t change radically. That is, the yarn sort of “fulls” or enlarges a bit, I guess, and they’re softer after washing, but … I’m not even CLOSE to felting—not that I want to do that.So, does that sound normal? I just read so MANY articles about all the care one has to take to avoid … shrinkage, felting, and whatnot. But (I’m laughing out loud here) mine seem just fine. I guess it “worries me” or maybe just surprises me that my scarves don’t change a lot. Should I be worried?!?!? LOLI guess a part of me wonders if I were doing something different, maybe they’d get softer in the finishing process. You know, I wonder if I’m doing “enough,” seeing as how my scarves don’t change all that much.

I will try to give you a quick answer :^)  Some natural fibres will shrink only a small amount, these are cotton, linen, bamboo, silk and most other yarns that are made from cellulose fibres. There are some animal fibres that like to shrink a lot and others that only shrink a little. Alpaca, Mohair, Camel all have fibre more like hair. It is long and smooth and they do not like to shrink. Wool is crinkly. The more crinkly the wool the more it fulls. Cashmere will bloom or full, but you don’t have much of it in your mix. Merino likes to shrink more than any other wool but if you are looking for a yarn that shrinks make sure it is not superwash.  Superwash is a finish that is added to wool yarns so they can be machine washed without shrinking. We sell lovely yarns on the website that shrink very well. They are Harrisville Shetland; Zephyr Wool/Silk 50/50; and 18/2 Merino wool. Hope this helps.

Featured below is the sample from our School of Weaving lesson on collapsing fabrics. It was woven with 30/2 JST hand dyed silk and 18/2 Merino in the warp and weft.


School of Weaving ~ Give the Gift of Learning!

Featured in this photo is a table runner from Season 3 Episode 5 – Warp Faced

Give the gift of learning, an all-access subscription to
Jane Stafford School of Weaving.
 Over 45 weaving lessons with a new episode every 5 weeks
Choose between 1 to 12 months!


Here to help

Here to help You can always find us on the Jane Stafford School of Weaving Forum or
on Weave with Jane Stafford at Ravelry.
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November 9th, 2021 newsletter

JST’s Shetland Blankie Recipe

I thought I would share Grant’s favourite Harrisville Shetland Blankie pattern with you – for freeHarrisville Shetland is such a wonderful blankie yarn. Available from JST in 46 lovely, heathered colours, it weaves up quickly and blooms beautifully when wet finished.
 
These blankets started as a 2 stripe overall division of space and then the borders and centre stripe were designed using the Fibonacci Numerical Series and overlaid on top. A pretty easy design process.

Grant couldn’t decide which green to pick for the centre … he kept going between Loden and Evergreen so … I decided he could have both. I used all the colours in the stripe for the weft in the second blanket, playing with the graphic. The other colours used were chosen to match different elements in our living room.

Enjoy weaving and cuddling under this blankie for many years to come 😉

Jane


Harrisville Shetland Yarns

100% wool available in 1/2 lb cones – 900 yds/cone (1800 yds per lb) Harrisville Shetland is spun more tightly (higher number of turns per inch) so it is very durable and will wear better and better every year. Washing makes the yarn even softer. The fibres blossom and have the ability to full and felt. Even if you knit with our yarn, it’s still a good idea to wash and block your finished project.
For more info on working with Shetland yarn, check out our Warping and Weaving with Harrisville Shetland as well as Fulling Instructions in the JST Knowledge Base for all the tips! For those that have a subscription to School of Weaving, don’t forget to check out/review Season 1 Episode 1.10.3 Fulling in the Washing Machine for more great tips on fulling fabrics. Jane fulls a mohair blanket in this episode but you can adapt the technique to make a Harrisville Shetland blanket.


Autumn Orchard Shetland Wraps

Do you feel like wrapping yourself – or someone on your gift list – in a layer of cozy warmth? This wrap is the one you didn’t know you wanted 😉 The colours will remind you of the apple orchards that were so colourful not so long ago. Imagine sitting at your loom mixing and blending all the wonderful Harrisville Shetland colours in this kit. You could use one of the included colourways for one wrap and with the other – just have the fun of creating your own design. 

Level of Difficulty:  Beginner
Weave structure: Plain Weave
Material: Harrisville Shetland
Each kit makes: 2 wraps (25.5″ X 74″ plus fringes)

Loom requirements:
Shafts: 4
Reed: 8 dent
Weaving width: 32″

Each kit includes:
Weaving instructions (including draft)
1 cone of Harrisville Shetland – Chianti
1 cone of Harrisville Shetland – Topaz
1 cone of Harrisville Shetland – Tundra
cone of Harrisville Shetland – Blackcherry


The gift that keeps on giving… share our Maiwa

download patterns with a friend

As we have shared with you in the past, the situation with COVID-19 in India and its affect on the Artisans Alliance of Jiwaja, continues to be challenging for the artisans. The Maiwa Foundation is working hard as they continue to support them through this period. Have you thought of giving a gift that keeps on giving??? You could give one of these fabulous patterns to a fellow weaver in your life. They would learn that the gift they are receiving is also supporting a group of talented artisans who happen to be in a very difficult situation. And, as it is that time of year and … you could also buy one for yourself and have the fun of weaving up a set of towels that you can give as gifts.

Maiwa Foundation logo

JST Gift Certificates

Since we’ve mentioned Christmas gifts – and I know Christmas is still quite a way off, but ….. have you been dreaming about that particular tool, some fabulous yarn – or dreaming really big, maybe about a new loom? Set up a Wish List on the JST Shop Store and just in passing mention that your list can be found there. You can manage your list under your account which gives you different options on how you might want to share it 😉 Your close circle can get a chance to look at your list and possibly give you a JST Gift Certificate towards something that you are really wishing for.

Schoolf of Weaving ~ Give the Gift of Learning!

Featured in this photo are placemats from Season 5 Episode 9 Huck & Twills

Give the gift of learning, an all-access subscription to
Jane Stafford School of Weaving.
 Over 45 weaving lessons with a new episode every 5 weeks
Choose between 1 to 12 months!


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You can always find us on the Jane Stafford School of Weaving Forum

or on Weave with Jane Stafford at Ravelry.


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November 2nd, 2021 newsletter

Now that Fall is fully with us – you know what’s next…

Can you believe that Christmas is next month? I’ve heard the slight hint of anxiety slip into the voices of several of my fellow weavers, including staff! I know that some of you have friends and relatives that look forward to a new tea towel each Christmas, but you have just been too busy with other weaving projects to plan a warp and get it on the loom. So… we thought we would feature some of our very Christmassy tea towels in this newsletter along with some warm and cuddly scarves that also would make wonderful gifts. Sorry….you still have to wind your warp and get it on your loom – but all the planning has been done for you 😉

Jane

Holly & Berry Tea Towel Kit

Level of Difficulty: Advanced Beginner
Weave structure: Plain Weave & (Atwater) Bronson Lace
Material: 8/2 organic cottolin
Each kit makes: 4 tea towels

Loom requirements:
Shafts: 4
Reed: 12 dent
Weaving width: 24″

Each kit includes:

Weaving instructions (including draft)
2 – 250g cones of cottolin – Natural
1 – 100g cone each of cottolin – Rich Red or Forest Green
(depending on colourway chosen)


Christmas Stripes Tea Towel Kit

Level of Difficulty: Beginner
Weave structure: Plain Weave
Material: 8/2 Organic Cotton
Each kit makes: 7 Towels

Loom requirements:
Shafts: 4
Reed: 12 dent
Weaving width: 23″

Christmas Stripes kit (makes 7 towels) includes:

Weaving instructions (including draft)

2 250g cones of 8/2 organic cotton- Linen White

1 100g cones of 8/2 organic cotton- Gift Green 1

100g cone of 8/2 organic cotton- Light Stone Grey

1 100g cone of 8/2 organic cotton- Burgundy

1 100g cone of 8/2 organic cotton- Kentucky


Merino and Silk Scarves – Melting Ice

Level of Difficulty: Advanced Beginner
Weave structure: 2/2 Twill Weave
Material: 20/2 Bombyx Silk, 18/2 Merino
Each kit makes: 2 Scarves

Loom requirements:
Shafts: 4
Reed: 12 dent (or use your reed substitution chart)

Each kit includes: Weaving instructions (including draft)

1 100g skein of 20/Bombyx Natural

1 100g skein of 20/Bombyx Rainy Day

1 100g cone of 18/2 Merino Shale

1 100g cone of 18/2 Merino Pewter


Merino and Silk Scarves – Chocolate & Vanilla

Level of Difficulty: Advanced Beginner
Weave structure: 2/2 Twill Weave
Material: 20/2 Bombyx Silk, 18/2 Merino
Each kit makes: 2 Scarves

Loom requirements:
Shafts: 4
Reed: 12 dent

Each kit includes: Weaving instructions (including draft)
1 100g skein of 20/Bombyx Violet Ice
1 100g skein of 20/Bombyx Double Chocolate
1 100g cone of 18/2 Merino Suede
1 100g cone of 18/2 Merino Vanilla


Ask Jane

Warp stripes more dominant than the weft stripes in Plain Weave – why? (from the JST Knowledge Base)

I am a member of a weaving study group in Halifax, NS and our members have taken Jane’s Colour and Design workshop. When studying our design samples, we noticed (specifically in the plain weave asymmetrical design) that the warp stripes were more dominant than the weft stripes. Why? Would the same thing happen in a balanced twill? Well, that is a very good question and I’m not entirely, absolutely, perfectly sure about this, but here is my theory: The warp is under more tension than the weft while weaving so when you look up close at how much of each thread is showing we see more warp. The weft does more dippy, divey stuff and gets hidden more. We have come to this conclusion because it happens in balanced twills too. I hope this helps and I’m glad you are studying your samples.

image of Asymmetry sample below: warp direction and weft direction →

Looking for a gift for the holidays?

Give the gift of learning, an all-access subscription to
Jane Stafford School of Weaving.
 Over 45 weaving lessons with a new episode every 5 weeks
Choose between 1 to 12 months!


Here to help

You can always find us on the Jane Stafford School of Weaving Forum or on Weave with Jane Stafford at Ravelry.