Patricia

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  • in reply to: Bench #197034
    Patricia
    Participant

      I’ve had my Louet David 90cm for a couple of years and use a Harrisville Designs small bench. I’m 5’3″ and also used this bench with my prior 36″ Schacht Mighty Wolf. It is an excellent bench, but I did make bench cushion for comfort. The bench is lightweight with wonderful handles that make it easy to move. There is also a little shelf/toolbox under the bench for small item storage. In addition, the bench height is easily adjusted and can be used flat or in a slight “rocking mode.” Here is the link: https://harrisville.com/products/bench-kit-small

      112419 David loom

      in reply to: Thoughts on 3.5 – Good Weaving Technique – Hemstitching #184633
      Patricia
      Participant

        Linda… here’s a PS to my post #182867 – immediately above (or below?) about instructions for Italian hemstitching. I have always used a plain (straight) tapestry needle for hemstitching, but somewhere saw a post about how much easier a bent darning/tapestry needle is for this purpose. I finally bought one and am using it now for the Candy Cane runner and, let me tell you, it is fantastic! The one I found on Amazon had two needles and a Chibi case (perfect, since the top on my 38-year-old Chibi case had recently broken off):

        https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000XZWGPE/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

        Good luck!

        in reply to: Thoughts on 3.5 – Good Weaving Technique – Hemstitching #182867
        Patricia
        Participant

          Linda, I have just warped this project on my David, and searched to see if Jane had a video or discussion/instructions for Italian hemstitching, but could find none. You’ll note on page 68 of the Nov/Dec 2020 issue of Handwoven there are some instructions for Italian hemstitching, but I found them to be a little too cryptic (only 2 illustrations of the technique) and not so helpful.

          Interweave did publish a one-page PDF to download which expanded on their hemstitching instructions above, and which had 3 illustrations for Italian hemstitching… better! Click the “download this PDF” link on page: https://handwovenmagazine.com/finishing-and-hemstitching/

          However, the very best help I could find was in a little old (published 1988) book on my shelf called “Finishing Touches for the Handweaver” by Virginia West. Several online yarn sources carry the paperback for $21. As an example, here it is at Yarn Barn of Kansas (a great resource, BTW): https://www.yarnbarn-ks.com/Finishing-Touches-For-the-Handweaver/productinfo/WB-0934026408/

          Hope this helps!

          in reply to: Mercerized Cotton 8/2 #178304
          Patricia
          Participant

            I definitely agree… unmercerized is preferred for tea/kitchen/guest towels as it is produces a more absorbent cloth.  I purchase it online from Yarn Barn of Kansas.

            The 8 oz tubes are from Maurice Brassard, in a large selection of colors:

            https://www.yarnbarn-ks.com/8_2-Cotton-B-from-Brassard/productinfo/WY-COT82B-/

            The 1 lb. cones are from Supreme/UKI and also in a large selection of colors:

            https://www.yarnbarn-ks.com/8_2-Cotton-A-colors/productinfo/WY-COT82A-/

            Their customer service is excellent, and they have helped me with color selections by email many times over the years.

             

            in reply to: Mercerized Cotton 8/2 #178305
            Patricia
            Participant

              And a “PS” to my post… here’s a photo of some tea towels I did back in 2009 with an Ms and Os weave structure using unmercerized cotton (this was a project published in the Jan/Feb 2006 issue of Handwoven).

              Towels 0309

              in reply to: Folding the Louet David #177305
              Patricia
              Participant

                You’re most welcome, Sharan!  Those furniture sliders from Amazon made it so easy – I was able to move/slide the loom without any assistance.  BTW, after the new floor was installed, I used these pads to protect the new floor and to keep the loom from sliding – they are excellent and the loom does not move during use:

                https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00CF38WV4/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

                in reply to: Folding the Louet David #177258
                Patricia
                Participant

                  I’m 2000 miles from my David at the moment, but hopefully I can help as I moved my loom through a doorway last February when we pulled up the carpet in my loom room.

                  Incidentally, I bought these furniture sliders for that purpose, and they were perfect. They have a smooth bottom to easily slide over the carpet. When we got to the doorway and it transitioned to ceramic tile, I pulled the “socks” over the sliders and the David slid easily over the tile.

                  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001WAK5VQ/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

                  I found a photo of the side/back of my loom while I was threading a project, and annotated it for clarity (I hope). Basically, you need to (a) release the spring on the friction brake by unhooking the bottom of the coil; (b) loosen and remove the wing nuts at the base of the back beam, so it can fold up against the castle; and (c) once resting against the castle, secure the back beam in the folded position by tying each end (I used some Texsolv cord) to hold it against the castle.

                  folding the back beam

                  Good luck!

                  in reply to: moving a David loom – with warp on? #153563
                  Patricia
                  Participant

                    Ginette, thank you so much for your helpful advice.  I wanted to hear from someone who had actually moved their David loom with a warp on, and that was exactly what I needed to know.

                    Kind regards,

                    Patricia

                    in reply to: best floor protection for David loom #150701
                    Patricia
                    Participant

                      Thanks, Dianne.  I actually found the Martinelli product on Amazon as well, and most of the reviews were favorable.  I’ve been debating about using the same pads we placed under heavy furniture in our tiled living room (we live in Arizona) which have worked exceptionally well (definitely thicker than the Martinelli, and just a little less expensive):  https://www.amazon.com/DURA-GRIP-Square-Non-Slip-Furniture-Protectors-Set/dp/B00CF38WV4?ref_=ast_bbp_dp

                      Thanks again for your thoughts!

                      in reply to: Weaving lambs wool Scottish plaid scarves #129225
                      Patricia
                      Participant

                        Beth, I have always wanted to learn to weave a tartan scarf.  In 2016, I found a weaver in Virginia who teaches tartan weaving (including classes at the John C. Campbell Folk Art School in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina).  For distant experienced weavers (I am in Tucson, AZ), she offers kits (2 scarves per kit) on Etsy, once you know which tartan you want to weave.  Her detailed instructions were excellent, and she graciously provided email support.  For my chosen Gordon Dress tartan, she provided the “sett,” which is the precise order of the five colors from the registry of tartans in Scotland.  The yarn in the tartan kit was an 18/2 Jaggerspun superfine Merino, a lightweight merino wool spun in Maine by Jaggerspun mills from Australian wool.  Although the kits are for two scarves, I wanted to make three and she provided the additional yarn (my warp was 7.5 yards for those scarves).

                        Here’s the tartan scarf kit on Etsy:  https://www.etsy.com/listing/111319629/custom-tartan-scarf-kits

                        And the photo below was taken when I started the warp on my previous Schacht Mighty Wolf loom.

                        These were fun to weave and turned out beautifully!

                        first tartan underway

                        in reply to: Monte Cristo Baby Blanket kit – reed substitution #127470
                        Patricia
                        Participant

                          Now that Thanksgiving is over, the Monte Cristo yarn is on the back beam, and I’m looking at heddle counts and weaving width.  This is only my fourth project on my 90cm David loom, and I’m probably overthinking this (I usually do!)…. but here are my questions.

                          This is a 4-shaft project and 70 heddles are needed on the first harness, and 68 on the 2nd through 4th harnesses.  (I have 125 heddles on each of my 8 harnesses.)  The width in the reed is 35″ and, for winding on, I used every space in the raddle to spread the warp!  It appears that I would need to remove all heddles from harnesses 5-8, and the excess heddles from harnesses 1-4) in order to utilize the full 35″ (90cm) weaving width of the David loom.  Correct?  Any other full-width weaving advice/tips?

                          I’m probably an advanced beginner (or a novice intermediate), and know just enough to be dangerous… but not always useful!  Many thanks in advance for the help from this invaluable forum!

                          in reply to: Monte Cristo Baby Blanket kit – reed substitution #117655
                          Patricia
                          Participant

                            Ah, Mary, thank you!  That makes perfect sense, and would account for all 274 ends.  Many thanks again!

                            in reply to: Monte Cristo Baby Blanket kit – reed substitution #117639
                            Patricia
                            Participant

                              I’m getting ready to warp this project (Monte Cristo Baby Blankie kit), and planning the heddle count.  I’m a bit confused with the threading sequence (1-2-3-4) which doesn’t appear to account for all 274 ends of the warp.  Directions are “thread 44 ends, one end per heddle, then thread 2 ends together in one heddle.  Repeat this sequence 4 more times.  End with your last 44 ends, one end per heddle…. the double thread will occur on different shafts.  The first double threads will be on the first shaft, the second on the second shaft, and so on.”  So, there are 6 groups of 44 threads (264 ends) and 5 additional ends for doubling (one at the end of the first 5 sections of 44 ends), for a total of 269 ends, correct?  If so, then there are 5 additional ends not accounted for in the 274-end warp.

                              Can someone who has warped this project help me with my confusion?  MANY thanks in advance!

                              in reply to: Monte Cristo Baby Blanket kit – reed substitution #111431
                              Patricia
                              Participant

                                Thanks for the quick reply and kind words of support!  I will give it a try.  I have done reed substitution before, but not with the rather distinct sleying directions that this project requires.

                                BTW, I also use an overhead light and a floor lamp, but my LED floor lamp provides fantastic lighting… and in 4 different color modes with a dimmer.  It’s $45 on Amazon:

                                https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06Y557YV7/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

                                Hope this helps!  And, thanks again!

                                • This reply was modified 4 years, 3 months ago by Patricia.
                                in reply to: Back to Front on a Schacht standard loom #83324
                                Patricia
                                Participant

                                  ​Before my current David loom, I had a Mighty Wolf that I warped B2F. I found a photo of how I used to tie onto the third (extra) wooden Schacht back apron rod with snap rings and a little bit of Texsolv cord.

                                  I learned the technique from Madelyn van der Hoogt, the former Handwoven editor and now founder/teacher of the Weaver’s School in WA state (I’ve attended two class series there):  https://www.weaversschool.com/

                                  She recommended 1/2″ snap rings; she found them at Ace Hardware. I ended up using 3/4″ snap rings (called “gate rings”) which I found on Etsy (no luck in local/hardware stores).

                                  I now have a metal rod with the David and use Jane’s technique for attaching with just a loop of Texsolv cord.

                                  ​FYI, there is no concern regarding the gap that is created between the actual apron rod and the extra apron rod for B2F warping. I used one ring at either end, and if the width of the warp in the reed is more than 18″, I put one in the middle (as you can see in my photo).

                                  snap rings 2snap rings 1

                                Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 25 total)