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What are the differences between a vertical countermarch and the Louet parallel countermarch loom?

I have been looking at countermarch looms.  What are the differences between a vertical countermarch and the  Louet parallel countermarch loom?  I have a David, which I love and would like a 12 harness loom.  I want to feel confident that my decision is based on some knowledge and not just because I love the David. 

#1.   The biggest advantage of a parallel counter-marche is the ease of tying it up.  Because both the upper and lower lamms move parallel to each other you only need two different lengths for your tie-up cords.  The uppers lamms all have the same length cord (long) and the lower lamms all have the same length cord (short).  Your upper lamms are your sinkers and your lower lamms are your risers. There is a blocking pin that is inserted into the texsolv system before you tie-up.  It blocks all harnesses and lamms so they are even.  Then you tie-up what you want depending on how you have derived your tie-up.  If you are using a tie-up from the Jack Loom pattern then you would tie the lower lamms just like you would on a Jack Loom and then you go back and tie-up what is left over on the top lamms.  ie:  for a 2/2 twill you would tie-up: 12, 23, 34, 14 to your lower lamms:

On the 1st treadle where you have tie-up 12….you would tie-up what is left over….  the 34 to the upper lamm directly above

On the 2nd treadle where you have tied-up 23….you would tie-up what is left over…the 14 to the upper lamm directly above

On the 3rd treadle where you have tied-up 34….you would tie-up what is left over…the 12 to the upper lamm directly above

On the 4th treadle where you have tied-up 14….you would tie-up what is left over…the 23 to the upper lamm directly above

Easy peasy.

#2.   The next great advantage is the size of your shed.   Because all the tie-up cords are the same length, either long or short, each and every shaft moves the same distance which guarantees a huge wonderful shed without fiddling with your tie-up cords.

#3.   Next comes the size of the loom.  Compared to traditional vertical counter-marche looms you don’t need a huge amount of real estate to house your loom.  They are so easy to weave on because they are smaller.  The floating breast beam which moves a very slight amount each time you step on a treadle has been designed to take all stress off of the frame of the loom when you open a shed.  This allows the looms to be smaller without compromising the strength of the loom.

#4.   With the parallel system we can have front slung treadles which are much easier on the lumbar when weaving for longer lengths of time.  There is no rocking in the lumbar region of your spine……a huge benefit to the body. I have woven on many many looms in my life…..can you tell that I love the Louets the most :^)  You would love the Spring Loom.