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Treadle tie-up on a 4 and 8 shaft loom

I have some questions about the treadle tie-up process, and how the 10 treadles might come into play.  I have only had 4 shaft looms, so using 8/10 treadles feels quite different to me.  Once I pick my pattern, get the threading going and then the tie-up, it will probably be much clearer.  If not, I’ll be sure to ask for guidance.

Just think of all those extra treadles as your reserve forces.  When you make the move to more pattern shafts you will need those treadles because you will have so many more options for tying them up in different sequences.  Typically every loom has 2 more treadles than they have pattern shafts.  Most 4 shaft looms have 4 shafts/6 treadles, 8 shaft looms have 8 shafts/10 treadles, 12 shaft looms have 12 shafts/14treadles etc.  Eventually, the more shafts you have will limit how many treadles you can fit under a loom and that is why dobby looms are in existence.  And that is another world ……   Which you don’t need to think about yet :^)

I guess my thinking will shift as I become familiar with 8 Shaft patterns.  On my previous loom I generally had a direct tie-up with 4 treadles and used the other 2 for plain weave/tabby,  but now I can’t assume the ‘additional’ 2 on the Louet are used for tabby…right??

Here is an example of how treadles work on 4.  A twill requires 4 treadle:

One treadle tied up to 1 and 2

One tied up to 2 and 3

One tied up to 3 and 4

One tied up to 1and 4

Plus 2 left over treadles for tabby.

For an eight shaft twill there are many more options for tying up your twill and you will have threaded your warp on all shafts so here is just one option

1234

2345

3456

4567

5678

1678

1278

Plus 2 left over for tabby

I would recommend getting the book The Weaver’s Book of 8-Shaft Patterns by Carol Strickler.  The world’s your oyster now.