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February 2021 Newsletter – Maiwa Fundraiser

Mai-wha-ta Lovely Towel

Maiwa Fundraiser for the Artisan Alliance of Jawaja

Pay What You Want Pattern Download

Hey….remember that marvellous Stash Crackle Pop pattern from Sharon Broadley…..well…..we’ve got another one 🙂 Sharon is an ardent weaver, lover and supporter of Maiwa, and that girl can take any towel warp and turn it into a luxurious shawl with a mere change of sett and weft yarn. We are so thrilled to present the Mai-Wha-ta Lovely Towel Pattern. And…..you can thank her daughter Lee for the name.


“I began very literally. I typed “helpmaiwa” into the Name Draft tool in Fiberworks and then played around with various options until I came up with a design I liked. Wanting to mimic the intricate Jacquard head borders on traditional Indian textiles, I threaded the design into 3 areas and left the remainder of the warp in plainweave. The colours come from the saturated colour palette that reminds me of India.” Sharon Broadley  

This pattern is written for 8 towels and 1 shawl. The 8 towels are woven at 20 EPI and then, after the towels have been woven, the warp is cut and re-sleyed at 16 EPI for the plain weave and 24 EPI for the twill, making the twill section more warp predominant.  The pattern could have been woven on 6 shafts but Sharon used 8 so she didn’t run out of heddles on her first 2 shafts…..that’s thinking ahead 🙂 The plain weave sections are threaded on 1-4 and the twill section is on 5-8.


So…..imagine a mostly plain weave towel with 3 bands of twill running vertically from top to bottom. The entire warp is made of 8/2 cotton. 


In this project we have 2 different weave structures threaded side by side. The plain weave section will have greater take-up in the warp than the twill sections. There is an interlacement between every single warp thread in the plain weave areas while, in the twill areas, the interlacement is between every 2 threads. This causes tension differences between the 2 areas. The twill section may feel loose or grow in length a little bit due to the take-up differential. If you raise shafts 5 to 8 with your hand you will be able to separate the twill sections of your warp. Standing at the back of the loom insert a 1/4” rod or dowel under those raised warp threads and then slide it down to the bottom of your warp beam – see the picture below. This is a simple way of dealing with tension differentials in warps. You may need to add additional weight to the rod if you find the twill sections becoming too long. Add your weights to both ends of your rod.


You will also notice that as the cloth winds onto the cloth beam, there is a differential in the buildup. Don’t worry about it.

Yarns & Colours Used for the Warp:
1 cone each of 8/2 cotton in Purple, Royal, Fuchsia, Cherry, & Turmeric

Towel Wefts:
All warp colours were used plus Orange, Apricot & Pale Limette. Remember…this is a great stash busting pattern as you only need approximately 3 full bobbins to weave a towel.

Shawl Weft:
One skein of JST Hand-dyed 20/2 Silk, some suggested colours are Coral Flame, Shameless, Starfish, Buddha Berry, Dragon Fruit or any colour that grabs your heart and reminds you of India.

So there you have it….another amazing pattern…..more great learning…..and a giant huge THANK YOU to Sharon. Ya gotta love it…..”helpmaiwa”

Jane

You can follow Sharon on Instagram @colour.woven


Recently I was on Soufilled Sisterhood Podcast with host Nicole Burguess speaking about my favourite topic weaving! No, her podcast is not a weaving or fiber arts podcast, but I shared with her listeners how I got interested in weaving, giving myself permission to play more with my weaving, and my goal of reaching more people with my teaching. This inspired Nicole to incorporate some of those mindsets and beliefs into her business. So whether you are a creator, entrepreneur, lover of yarn, or curious about my path in textiles click here to listen and read the show notes.


Season 5 Kits are Back in Stock!


We’ve restocked our shelves with Season 5 Kits all ready for your looms!

Episode 2 airing February 25th – Canvas Weave


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January 2021 Newsletter

Picnic Basket Tea Towels

Lovely Linen Towels

I know it’s only January – but it’s never too early to think about a picnic – so, here is a new kit celebrating Venne’s GOTS certified Linen and Cottolin. 8 glorious towels can be woven on this warp. All you need is a 4 shaft loom with a weaving width of 21″. Twill and basketweave are combined in the threading to offer a multitude of treadling opportunities. 4 towels are woven with a linen weft and 4 towels have a cottolin weft.


Rustic Elegance Tea Towel Kit is back in stock!

C$109.00
We’re so happy to have Rustic Elegance back in stock…..another fabulous towel celebrating Venne’s GOTS certified linen

Rustic Elegance gives you 4 stunning towels exploring Colour and Weave on Huck Weft floats and a simple 2 stripe design. All you need is a 4 shaft loom 23″ weaving width. It’s time to weave some modern elegant heirlooms! 

JST Online Guild Season 5 Kits

We’ve been busy kitting up yarns for the start of Season 5’s JST Online Guild presentations and have plenty of kits for 5 episodes …. well, only a few for Episode 3 but there is a huge shipment of cones on the way. 

Season 5 Episode 1 – Turned Twill

Surprise! Partial Cones Available 🙂

Do you want to add a dash of colour to your next warp?
A splash of something that adds a zinger to your scarf, tea towel or blanket?

The Studio is overflowing with partial cones left over from winding down from big cones. So.….we are offering surprise bags of partial cones at a steal of a price! Each bag is guaranteed to have a certain amount of yarn depending on the type of fibre. The bags will have a palate of different colours in them with no guarantees on what you will get, so.…have fun being surprised!

200g of 18/2 Merino
(3-6 cones of surprise colours)
C$40.00

150g of 18/2 Zephyr
(3-6 cones of surprise colours)
C$50.00

200g of 40/2 Linen
(3-6 cones of surprise colours)
C$30.00

200g of Bambu 12
(3-6 cones of surprise colours)
C$28.00

200g of Bambu 7
(3-6 cones of surprise colours)
C$28.00

150g of brushed mohair
(2-5 cones of surprise colours)
C$36.00


Here to help

You can always find us on the Jane Stafford Online Guild Forum or on Weave with Jane Stafford at Ravelry.

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Maiwa Foundation

Maiwa Foundation logo

An Update on Maiwa

To all our Wonderful Maiwa Supporters

I have a report for you :). Please read to the bottom because there’s a letter from India addressed to all of you ‘many Mam weaver mams’.

And, because this need is ongoing we have relaunched the ‘pay what you want’ towel patterns on our website. Stash Crackle Pop & Tea Towel Time with Jane are back. Just look for that Maiwa Foundation square on the shop drop menu. I’ll be adding new patterns this year so there will be more ways to participate. 

It is so important that you know how much you’ve helped. I thank you from the bottom of my heart. 
Love and stay safe,

Jane

Message from Charllotte Kwon
The Maiwa Foundation

To Jane and her wonderful community of weavers – a huge thank you for your incredibly generous donation.  The story of Jawaja is a long one .  .  . and now you are all part of that story.  

The whole process of making this donation from Jane and her community through the Maiwa Foundation during these extraordinary times has been amazing for us – not to mention coming with it’s own learning curve.   

We realized by September, that because all the artisans had been effected by covid we needed to be very transparent with whatever money we donated since the issues were not isolated issues of – for example – earthquake, or drought, or flood etc.  All artisans had issues and it was important that we let all those that we work with know about what money was available for donation.  

I decided to put together a small team to help wth the decision making – that comprised of a mentor of mine Ashoke Chatterjee (retired head of National Institute of Design and President of Craft Council of India) along with 4 artisans who head up groups we work with – from various areas in India.  

This took some time and what was surprising to us all was that the artisans who had ongoing orders from Maiwa told us that they did not think it was right for them to take any of the money.  They were fine as long as there were ongoing orders.  They explained that most, if not all, of their local work had stopped but if they had Maiwa work they were fine.    

So we then had to look at areas where Maiwa would not place large enough orders to various artisans for them to have income throughout the year – going forward.  I had always known that the artisans would be alright for the first 8-10 months but that their local work would end once the Indian economy felt the impact of no tourism, very little exports and an unemployed middle class.   

Maiwa has done well online with most products.  But two areas are slow – leatherwork and woven carpets.  Normally our orders would be fine because they are augmented by our annual India Tour (that is cancelled for February 2021). Jawaja sell three months worth of leather bags and carpets in that single day we visit.  Jawaja does sell at craft fairs in India – which are all cancelled now.   

Things slipped south for Jawaja Leatherworkers and Weavers quite quickly in early December  – they are 25 artisan families (a total of about 250 people as these are joint families) and they had run out of money to live.  There is no safety net in India – particularly for remote villages and low caste – both of which these artisans are.  We made the decision to send $16,000 to them and we have reserved $9000 as we continue to see what groups may be falling through the cracks.  

I, personally, am deeply grateful to all of you .  .  .    

Charllotte Kwon

Director – The Maiwa Foundation  

This is the letter we received today from Babulalji – who is the treasurer of the co-operative:

Respected Mam and Mam Jane mam,

Namskar, 

Thankyou for give work for and help us. At this time our artisan face very bad situation due to Kovid-19. No Work  No income so our artisan require work for income.  We need help for 25 artisan family for maintenance and feeding. Thank you of heart for 8 lakh.  We receive this from Maheshbhai today.  This save us at this time for no money for so long.  We are happy and we thank Mam Jane and many Mam weaver mams

We have deposit for next order.   No supplies is possible now.  

We hope we see you soon.  Are you come to Jawaja? 

Thanks & Regards. 

Babulal

Jawaja Leather & Weaver Alliance


Pay What You Want

Pattern Download

Tea Towel Time With Jane

These towels are a fantastic opportunity to explore some of the ways you can layer graphic and different weave structures onto the same warp. 

These colourful towels were woven during the COVID-19 pandemic earlier this year. Over the course of 3 weeks these towels were woven live on Facebook and during that time a fun, creative, caring community was formed.

Stash Crackle Pop!

The “Stash, Crackle, Pop!” pattern is a great stash buster … you gain a lesson on Crackle Weave and … end up with some pretty eye-popping towels!
This ‘pay what you want’ pattern was designed by our darling Sharon Broadley, who contributes so much to JST and can be found on Instagram as @colour.woven 🙂

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The Lace Weaves are coming in 2021!

Hi Kids,

Before I turn your weaving world towards laces, I really want to say thank you to all of you who have supported my dream of being able to reach out to more weavers than I could ever fit in my Studio. Some of you stepped into my world at the very first episode and others have joined us along the way. Every one of you has helped me continue my love of teaching and I thank you all from the bottom of my heart. I hope the episodes have brought some focus and relief during this extremely difficult year.

And now it’s that time of year again….time for a wee snippet detailing our programme for 2021. I’ve spent the last 6 months preparing for our upcoming season on Lace and we have the first 5 episodes completed. Once again, I worked with my Dream Team who wove spectacular examples of the ideas presented in the episodes. The Show and Tells are incredible this year.

Before we dive into Lace we will do one more episode on Twills….I just had to tell you about Turned Twill which is one of my favourite weave structures. Then we’ll tackle Canvas Weave, Huck, Huck with Colour and Weave effects, Bronson Spot, Atwater Bronson Lace, Blended Lace and how we can get Lace and Twills all in one piece.

I hope you enjoy our little trailer,

Stay Safe kids.
Sending tons of love,
Jane


Laces

a study of cloth with holes


Season 5 2021 Release Dates & Yarn List


Episode 1 –  Turned Twill, January 21 – Yarn: 7 cones of 8/2 cotton: 3 cones of Taupe, 2 cones of Gold, 1 cone of Red and one cone of White/Bleached.  (12 towels) Jane also used lots of bobbins from her 8/2 stash 

Episode 2 – Canvas Weave, February 25 – Yarn: 2 x 250 gram cones of 16/2 Venne Organic Linen in White, 1 x 100 gram cone of 16/2 Venne Organic Linen in Light Stone Grey (long sample or runner)

Episode 3 – Huck, April 1 – Yarn: 400 grams of Bambu 7 in Periwinkle (samples and a scarf)

Episode 4 – Huck Colour & Weave, May 6 – Yarn: 5 cones of 8/2 cotton, 2 Black, 2 White/Bleached and 1 Pale Limette (6 gamps)

Episode 5 – Swedish Lace, June 10 – Yarn: 2 cones of 8/4 cotton in Nile Green and 1 cone of 8/4 cotton in Denim (long sampler or runner)

Episode 6 – Bronson Spot, July 15 Yarn: TBA

Episode 7 – Atwater Bronson Lace, August 19 Yarn: TBA

Episode 8 – Blended Lace, September 22 Yarn: TBA

Episode 9 – Huck & Twills, October 28 Yarn: TBA

Episode 10 – Lace Grande Finale, November 18 

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JST Blog October Weaver Spotlight!

Hi kids,

This month we’re shining the weaver’s spotlight on Rebecca Logan from Stony Plain, Alberta. Rebecca is a fabulous weaver, an animal lover extraordinaire and I love her for her gardening skills. I love how she takes the seeds I sow and grows an entirely different garden from each packet of weaving seeds 🙂
Yes, we sow weaving seeds at JST and the end result is why I love to share ideas….it is such a joy to watch gardens spring up all over the place. Important take away…..be inspired by things you see around you and then take those ideas and gently guide them to your happy place.

I hope you enjoy Rebecca’s take on Tea Towel Time with Jane….

Sending tons of love

Jane


When I saw Jane’s Tea Towel Time towels, I was immediately hooked. They were all so beautiful and colourful, and yet each was uniquely fascinating. I had to try them!  

Although Jane’s colour choice was gorgeous, I was feeling spicy at the time, and substituted hot colours for her cools, sticking with similar values.  Her black became my chocolate, the light bright green was substituted with cayenne, and the purple and peacock became merlot and magenta. 

I made a mistake while winding the warp chains, missing a few repeats of the four-end sequence, so then had to repeat the error with a later warp chain for symmetry.  

A run of twelve towels, each different, was like freedom at the loom. With each towel I could try something completely different, or play upon something I liked about an earlier towel. For example, I wove three towels with the same border sequence, one in straight draw twill, one in basketweave, and one in turned twill, just to be able to enjoy the subtle differences. 

Another favourite was what I called the wiggles. Jane wove them as point twill treadling, but I wanted them to be more wiggle than zigzag, so played about in my weaving software to find the correct rosepath treadling that gave me those desired wiggles. That towel was so much fun I wove it twice, with different weft colours.  

That towel was so much fun I wove it twice, with different weft colours.  

Everyone who sees the finished towels understands how much fun they must have been to weave, although that may be my gushing enthusiasm in talking about them. I know that such long warps (12 yards, as long as I could make) no longer intimidate me. Now I see them as an opportunity for play!  And maybe that was Jane’s intent – to encourage the freedom of playing at the loom.  

I was lucky enough to have five different in-person classes with Jane before she went digital, and consider those weeks some to the most important in my development as a weaver.  Now that the guild is available, I’m diving even deeper into the most joyful details. Weaving is a gift that will keep me interested for a lifetime, and hand woven dish towels have become my art form.  

Learn more about the JST Online Guild Weaving Lessons!

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August 2020 Newsletter

August is a month of harvest around here….we are so busy, picking, freezing and processing food from that big garden out there. Some of the first signs of fall are peeking out like the Virginia Creeper and the temperature is perfect 🙂 I know that a lot of weavers are also gardeners and the first signs of the fall are so welcome because we can put that garden to bed and put our feet up.

Sending tons of love,
Jane


Majestic Maple Silk Colourway

Fall inspired silk colours in 20/2 Tussah Silk, hand dyed right here on Salt Spring Island just waiting for your loom 🙂


  4 skeins of 100% Silk Spun in Switzerland 5000 yds/lb, 1100 yds/skein
C$196.00


Selected Bambu Colours – 20% off Sale

We’re making some room on our shelves and discontinuing some Bambu colours. Get them soon before they are all gone!

Regular C$20.00 – Sale C$16.00 on selected colours

Don’t worry, we still carry a lot of colours in Bambu 7 & 12  🙂


Gange Sunrise Scarf Kit

These lovely scarves are perfect for spring and summer! Woven with silk on linen in  alternating bands of 1/3 and 3/1 twill, they have gorgeous sheen and drape with a slightly crisp texture that will only get softer and more shimmery with wear. This pattern requires only 4 harnesses, but there are 8 different tie-ups required for weaving. If you have an 8 shaft loom, you’re stylin’, but if you have a 6 treadle loom, we’ve provided a tie-up system to ensure your success!

Read more


Fulford Mist Scarf Kit

Here on Salt Spring Island, we are so lucky to live near both the ocean and the mountains. At Fulford Harbour you can admire the two at once, especially as you approach the island on the ferry. Lovely deep ocean views complemented by misty mountain tops – so West Coast, so subtle and inspiring.

These elegant scarves are made with two colours of our 30/2 silk woven on our 40/2 linen in a timeless 2/2 twill. The combination of crisp linen and shimmering silk is exquisite.

Read more


Here to help

You can always find us on the Jane Stafford Online Guild Forum or on Weave with Jane Stafford at Ravelry.

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JST Blog August Weaver Spotlight!

Hi kids,

It’s so wonderful to once again be able to share another weaver’s exploration of the lessons learned in Colour and Design. Gail Maier has taken that knowledge and layered structures from Twills on Four to create her own unique cloth. It makes my heart sing 🙂

Check out Gail on Instagram @nesthandwovens to see more of her amazing work.

Jane


My name is Gail Maier, and I live in Victoria, British Columbia. The weaving “bug” bit me about 7 years ago – when I was lying on a woven beach towel and noticed that it was completely different on one side vs. the other. My curiosity was triggered, and I had to learn how to do that – my passion for weaving was launched!

I have been a member of the Online Guild from the start, and I have also been fortunate to take several workshops on Salt Spring Island with Jane in the past. But that didn’t include twills on four, and I was super excited when this season began.

Both threading gamps were my inspiration for this project. I wanted to show pattern possibilities by using multiple threadings in one project, without it getting too busy. So, I went back to my all-time favourite lessons from the Online Guild, Colour and Design, Jane’s first lessons. I wanted to use a strong graphic to organize the different twills and chose a three-stripe design with wide-ish borders and edges. My studio shelves have been recently restocked with luscious Venne organic cotton, and I wanted to use some of my new stash. The warm warp colours I choose were havanna, brick red and brass, set off by frames of curry which resulted in some good colour play.

I knew I wanted to fill each big stripe with a different twill, and I also thought it would look cool if the curry-coloured edges and borders could be a different twill too. So, after studying the gamps I chose 3 different point twill threadings and a straight draw threading for the borders. This allowed me to make the intersections where the twills meet have clean, sharp lines.

Twill sett used was 20 epi; I find that I can beat this sett at 20 picks per inch consistently and the resulting cloth is still sturdy enough but also has some nice drape.

The point twills are my favourites, and I selected these – #4 and 5 from the small threading gamp, and M’s and W’s from the large threading gamp. So I then figured out threading repeats by section and drafted so that the big stripes were as equal as possible in size. The warp was 450 inches long, 474 ends, enough for a dozen towels that are 33 inches on the loom and 23 ¾ inches thru the reed. 

Weaving the first towel as drawn in is a great place to start. Treadling each section trompe as writ, or following the threading, resulted in some interesting different patterns. I especially liked the design created by treadling 1234 – 321 – 234 – The “wall of troy” threading. I knew I wanted to play with lots of variations, so I decided that when I overlaid ideas from prior classes I should keep one treadling throughout. Otherwise it seemed the design would get too busy.

In the next few towels I used just one treadling sequence, except when I was adding framing borders in the warp colour, curry. In these cases, they were also treadled in a straight draw, which made the frames and borders more distinctive.

My favourite technique to play with is to use colour and weave sequencing options to produce some horizontal stripes, using Fibonacci sequences. This created some really interesting variations, making the cloth look totally different – almost as if I had rethreaded it. Very cool, and this effect was most interesting when the treadling sequences were an odd number, like #5 (1234-1-4321). I used either 2 or 4 picks per stripe so two shuttles were easy to manage – one on each side of the cloth. These stripes inspired me to use this idea in a plaid, and it worked well. The resulting patterns are not traditional plaids, but it’s still plaid-like. These are some of my personal favourites, especially the purple one.

I switched out colours and pushed the combinations so that the cloth wasn’t warm anymore, using purple, deep red and turquoise weft colours.

Lessons learned from this project include the following:

  • small twill patterns need to be “held” in a strong graphic to make them more interesting and sophisticated looking. 
  • proved to myself (again) that purple and turquoise can work with almost any other colour – magenta too
  • applying Jane’s concepts in the Colour and Design lessons are the most important to me. Learning weave structures is interesting and gives options to create cloth with different hands and for different uses, but the design lessons are always my foundation. 

This was a really fun project and the resulting dozen kitchen towels are lovely; a great study in how simple little twills can make big bold statements. Great learning, and I look forward to doing another 4-shaft twill project very soon!

Learn more about the JST Online Guild weaving lessons!

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July Newsletter

Fundraiser Update 🙂

Hi Kids,  Have I told you how wonderful you are lately?…….well you are. We have some of the most generous and amazing folks on this email list. So now you have to sit down…..those 2 “pay what you want” tea towel patterns and the auction have raised $19,641.00 and we are happy to round that to $20,000.00 for the Maiwa Foundation. Charllotte Kwon was speechless when I gave her the news on Saturday. 

So thank you, thank you, thank you…..you have no idea what this means to artisans who work with Maiwa. It lets them know that there are weavers and artisans in other parts of the world who are thinking of them and sending them love. We all work with our hands, and no matter where we live, we all feel strength from creating textiles.  That’s what ties our community together and we have such an awesome community!

Thank you…just one last time.
Sending tons of love,
Jane


Organic Spring & Easter Tea Towel Kit

Some things take a little longer than others to get up and running …..
how about these two beauties ….
we tried to get these kits ready for Easter ….
but July seems like a nice month …. too funny …
and best intentions!   😉

This tea towel kit is made entirely of organic cotton. Weaving with organic cotton is a great way to begin supporting yarns that are respectful of the earth and the farmers that grow them. We know it is more expensive, but even if you use regular cotton for your warp and organic cotton for the weft you will still be making an important contribution. Our organic cotton is GOTS certified (Global Organic Textile Standard)

Level of Difficulty: Beginner
Weave structure: Plain Weave
Material: 8/2 Organic Cotton
Each kit makes: 4 Towels

Loom requirements: 4 shafts, 12 dent reed and weaving width of 23 inches

The kit comes in 2 colour ways

Easter Stripes

Easter Stripes kit includes:

  • Weaving instructions (including draft)
  • 3 100g cones of 8/2 organic cotton- cream
  • 1 100g cones of 8/2 organic cotton- light lilac
  • 1 100g cone of 8/2 organic cotton- anemoon
  • 1 100g cone of 8/2 organic cotton- fern green
  • 1 100g cone of 8/2 organic cotton- steel blue

Spring Stripes

Spring Stripes kit includes:

  • Weaving instructions (including draft)
  • 3 100g cones of 8/2 organic cotton- cream
  • 1 100g cones of 8/2 organic cotton- deep yellow
  • 1 100g cone of 8/2 organic cotton- egyptian blue
  • 1 100g cone of 8/2 organic cotton- fern green
  • 1 100g cone of 8/2 organic cotton- apple

A Few More Organic Tea Towel Kits

We have a few more kits in stock with certified organic cotton!
If you’d like to learn more about GOTS (Global Organic Textile Standard) check out their website.

Rustic Elegance
Price C$109.00

Sassy Brassy Log Cabin
Price C$144.00


It’s the Little Things!

JST Online Reed Substitution Calculator

Check out our new Online Reed Substitution Calculator on our Knowledge Base. And don’t worry, we still have the PDF Chart available right here and our video on How to Read a Reed Substitution Chart.

Here to help

You can always find us on the Jane Stafford Online Guild Forum or on Weave with Jane Stafford at Ravelry.

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June Newsletter

Stash Crackle Pop!

We have a treat for you this month…..and I think we could all use a little treat 🙂

The “Stash, Crackle, Pop!” pattern is a great stash buster … you gain a lesson on Crackle Weave and … end up with some pretty eye-popping towels! This ‘pay what you want’ pattern was designed by our darling Sharon Broadley, who contributes so much to JST and can be found on Instagram as @colour.woven 🙂 You may be following her amazing daily tea-towels there, she just hit day 100!

Sharon has also been to India with Maiwa on 2 occasions and I know from travelling with her, just how supportive she is of the Maiwa Foundation’s work with textile artisans in India. So guess what? Whatever you pay for this pattern is going to the Maiwa Foundation. Let’s make what we raised for such a good cause with the Tea Towel Time with Jane fundraiser, go even further to help our fellow artisans in India.

And … our Maiwa Fundraiser is still carrying on for a few more weeks. So, if you didn’t get a chance to get your Tea Towel Time with Jane pattern, you still have time. The final date for the Fundraising Auction is scheduled for July 16th, but we’ll update you before then 😉

Jane

Stash Crackle Pop Warp & Weft Colours

Not sure if you have all the colours for the pattern? We’ve put a list together of all the cotton colours used in the Stash, Crackle Pop pattern, in case you might be missing some of them. You can purchase them right here

Note: Stash Crackle Pop is only offered as a PDF pattern, no kits 🙂

Buy the Stash, Crackle, Pop PDF Pattern


Merino & Silk Scarf Kits

These supremely beautiful scarves ticks all the boxes! Since they are woven with silk on merino, they are super soft and warm with silky drape, and has that magic sheen we all love. The design is simple and classic with two stripes on the warp and design options for the weft. They are one of those life-time scarves. They just won’t go out of fashion or favour. Offered in 2 colourways!

Each kit includes merino & silk yarns with the pattern to weave 2 scarves! 

Melting Ice

Pewter and Shale merino with Natural and Rainy Day silk in the weft
C$159.00

Chocolate & Vanilla

Suede and Vanilla merino with Violet Ice and Double Chocolate silk in the weft
C$172.00


Summer Inspired Tea Towel Kits

Our much loved bouclé kits weave up quickly for a Summer project on the loom. Each kit weaves 9 tea towels and make the perfect host/hostess gifts!

Mountain Bouclé Tea Towel Kit
Price C$90.00

Summer Sea Bouclé Tea Towel Kit
Price C$90.00


Here to help

You can always find us on the Jane Stafford Online Guild Forum or on Weave with Jane Stafford at Ravelry.

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JST Blog June Weaver Spotlight!

Hi kids,

This month I’m happy to introduce you to another member of our Online Guild – Arlene Kohut. Arlene is a wonderful weaver who enjoys the design possibilities of layering elements into the fabric that she weaves. You may recall Season 2’s episode on Stripes where I showed you 2 tea towels that Arlene designed layering striping and Bronson Lace. In this blog post she takes us on her journey exploring this season’s Twills on 4’s Simple Two Stripe sample.

If you would like to see more of Arlene’s weaving, you can follow her on Instagram @inkohootsweaving.


My name is Arlene Kohut. I live in Victoria, British Columbia. I started weaving 10+ years ago after my son’s Grade three teacher brought a rigid heddle loom to class for the students to weave a class project. I was able to weave a couple of inches since I was a class parent helper. Once I realized that cloth could be created from fibre woven on a loom, I was hooked. 

In the past I had taken ‘Twills on Four’, the in-person class with Jane. So in January 2020 when Jane posted her first Online Guild class of the year, Season 4 – Episode 1 – Introduction to Twill & Simple Two Stripe Sample, I watched the videos and took notes. Once the video session was complete I reviewed my notes and doodles and had an ‘a-ha moment’. I kept seeing “borders” and I was intrigued with mixing plain weave and twill together. I just wanted to play on a warp ASAP.

I decided to skip the samples for this guild session and go right to weaving towels. My stash did not have enough Charcoal 8/2 Cotton but there were two cones each of Olive and Natural. My brother is having a big birthday later in the year and he likes green so why not make towels? I made the warp wider than suggested by Jane and wove a couple of inches of each technique that she demonstrated on her loom video (so I would have a condensed sample for myself). Then I started playing with what I learned from this episode.

My first sample where I could see borders and different patterns that I could incorporate into a towel.

Then a towel woven in Olive and using a fibonacci stripe sequence, continuing in the 2/2 twill pattern throughout. Just the colour changes in the stripe sequence:
 

2 Natural
3 Olive
5 Natural
3 Olive
2 Natural

Another towel using Olive weft and a natural for the border. Then changing the twill direction every one inch for the centre part of the towel and finishing off the towel with the same border on the other end.

This towel has the same border as the towel above but I used natural as the main towel colour. In the centre of this towel I used a direction pattern change every four picks creating a zig zag effect in the centre of the towel.

For this towel I played around with colour and design. I have a graphic below in my notes.

Lastly, I found some matching 2/16 cotton in a similar dye lot and switched to a slow clasp weft weave. This idea came from a fellow weaver, Kathy Ready. The two us throw ideas at each other so I gave Kathy’s idea a try. I found this design appealing and it gave me more ideas. So………

I made a second longer warp of 2/8 cotton. Going back to my stash I chose Chocolate for the dark side and a strand of Ivory and Beige alternating for the light side (because I only had a cone and a bit of each). Then I started to play again…….

These are some of the towels from this second warp. I used basket weave for the border on the top left towel, which I will try again. I like the colour that was created by using a strand of the Ivory and Beige. Unfortunately, I could not capture this colour on a photo. So you will have to take my word. 

AND I played some more. I am not use to just weaving with neutral colours so I had to add some colour in this lot of clasp weft towels.

What have I learned from this session? Weaving these towels were fun while trying to decide where to put a border and what type. I love the texture that occurs when using plain weave in between four picks of 2/2 twill. Changing twill direction makes its own zig zag pattern. Basket weave for a horizontal border, who would have thought. This session has given me lots of new ideas to play with and I still have more ideas to try in the future.
 
Below, I have included my rough notes for the second sets of towels and a photo of three stripes that I wove on the last little bit of warp. I will keep this bit of weaving for future reference.



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